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In previous articles we have gone through and examined every occurrence of the Hebrew word “Sheol,” the word often translated as “hell” in many English Bible versions. We saw that it is something that both the righteous and the wicked expect to go to when they die. After examining its use we concluded that it is not a place at all, but rather a state of being, basically the state of death. Those who are in Sheol are those who are in the death state. Yet Sheol is the death state with resurrection in view, which is why both the righteous and the wicked, both God’s people and His enemies, are said to be there after death. Read the rest of this entry »

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Many would insist that the Bible speaks very clearly about hell. Yet questioning such people usually shows that they obviously have never properly considered the Biblical evidence regarding hell. No source but the Bible is truly a reliable one for discovering the reality about the idea that the wicked are bound for a place of eternal suffering called “hell,” yet many get their ideas as much from tradition, orthodoxy, or the songs and hymns they sing as they do from the pages of God’s Word. It is not enough just to say we are Bible believers. In order to actually be that, we need to discover what the Bible says and then believe it. That has been our goal in this study so far. Read the rest of this entry »

In our last message in this series, “Heaven in the Books of Exodus to Deuteronomy,” we discussed that the Hebrew word for heaven is “shamayim,” pronounced “sha-MAH’-yim.” We examined the fourteen occurrences of the word “heaven” in the book of Exodus, the one occurrence of “heaven” in the book of Leviticus, and the first thirteen occurrences of “heaven” in the first four chapters of the book of Deuteronomy. Along with our previous study of the first forty-one occurrences of the word “heaven” as they appear in the book of Genesis, this study took us through the first sixty-nine occurrences of the Hebrew word shemayim. From these studies we found what seem to be the following five definitions of the word “heaven.”

1. The exalted place where the LORD is and where angels dwell.

2. The sky, which is lifted up above the earth.

3. The greater universe, where the sun, moon, stars, planets, and galaxies exist.

4. Exalted beings or rulers, whether rulers of heaven or rulers on earth.

5. God Himself, Who is sometimes called heaven or the heavens.

Yet there is much more to learn about this word from the remainder of its occurrences in Scripture, so in this message we will continue our examination of this important word by continuing on from chapter 5 of the book of Deuteronomy. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following comment:

THE LORD JESUS CHRIST DIED AT THE STAKE, NOT ON A CROSS

I of course am aware of this argument, as Bullinger makes it in The Companion Bible. I am not convinced, however.

First of all, in spite of Bullinger’s statements, the archeological evidence seems to point to crucifixions having been done with a cross piece, not on a stake. The early depictions and descriptions seem to confirm this. Read the rest of this entry »

In our last message in this series, “Heaven in the Book of Genesis,” we discussed that the Hebrew word for heaven is “shamayim,” pronounced “sha-MAH’-yim,” and the first occurrence of this word is in the very first verse of the Bible, Genesis 1:1. We examined this verse and the first forty-one occurrences of the word “heaven” as they appear in the book of Genesis. From our examination of all Genesis we found what seem to be the following three definitions of the word “heaven.”

1. The exalted place where the LORD is, and where angels dwell.

2. The sky, which is lifted up above the earth.

3. The greater universe, where the sun, moon, stars, planets, and galaxies exist. Read the rest of this entry »

In the first six articles in this series, we have studied all the occurrences of the word “soul” in the first eight books of the Old Testament from Genesis to Ruth. Examining the Hebrew word nephesh or “soul” in these books, we discovered eight possible meanings for this word, which are as follows:

1. Any living creature of the land, sea, or air.

2. Any of the above creatures after they are dead.

3. What man is as a product of his body and his breath of life being mixed together.

4. The blood of men, or something connected to the blood of men. Read the rest of this entry »

In the first five articles in this series, we have studied all the occurrences of the word “soul” in the first five books of the Old Testament, called the law of Moses or the “Torah,” the word for “law” in Hebrew. Examining the Hebrew word nephesh or “soul” in Genesis through Deuteronomy, we discovered eight possible meanings for this word, which are as follows:

1. Any living creature of the land, sea, or air.

2. Any of the above creatures after they are dead.

3. What man is as a product of his body and his breath of life being mixed together.

4. The blood of men, or something connected to the blood of men.

5. People.

6. A person’s self or being.

7. A dead person.

8. The emotions, strong feelings, desires, and appetites of men.

So now we continue our study into the so-called historical books of the Bible, starting with the book of Joshua. Let us see if these eight definitions continue to cover all the occurrences of this word, and what else we can learn about souls from the book of Joshua. Read the rest of this entry »

In our first two articles in this series, on “Spirits in Genesis” and “Spirits in Exodus to Deuteronomy,” we examined the word “spirit” in the Old Testament, and discovered that the Hebrew word is ruach, pronounced “roo’-akh,” with the emphasis upon the first syllable. We examined the eleven occurrences of this word in Genesis and the twenty-four occurrences of this word from Exodus to Deuteronomy and determined six different possible meanings for the word “spirit” to get the following list. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

Phil 3:20 For our conversation is in heaven; from whence also we look for the Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ:

In this passage you say that “heaven” is plural.

How did you know that this is a plural word?

Greek is en ouranois. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

I know you are working on Colossians, so you may have a ready answer to this question. I think (Otis Q. Sellers) was the one who came up with the translation “rights of God” to replace “the right hand of God.” However, I have always thought it awkward in English. Rights in its plural form quite often is preceded by a defining word, like human or inalienable. None of the synonyms seem to work either.

I think (Mr. Sellers) intended it in the sense of “rights and privileges,” that is, that He has the very privileges and authorities of God. He is partially getting that idea from the fact that, at least in some cases, the word is actually plural, and no word for “hand” appears. That probably suggested to him the translation of “rights.” However, since the phrase “on my rights and on my lefts” (Matthew 20:23) does occur, the fact that the word is sometimes plural does not in itself justify the translation of “rights.” Read the rest of this entry »