I received the following question:

Another question do you think that “Solomon’s soul was in mortal danger” in 1 Kings 1:12 when Nathan spoke, “save your soul and the soul of your son Solomon” or do you think that is about desires?

Solomon and Bathsheba would both likely have been executed by a son of David on the throne other than Solomon himself. I do not think they would have just been reduced to poverty. Remember, Bathsheba should have died according to the law. Solomon, though he was conceived after his parents married, could be considered an illegitimate by the other sons. At the very least, David’s choice of him would mean that he was a danger to any other son of David who successfully took the throne. The death of them both would have been the only safe solution for Adonijah or any other son of David taking the throne.

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I received the following question:

As I was looking at it, it seemed like Nehemiah must have been incredibly old when he sat down to write Nehemiah. I mean 7 generations of kids since the captivity! 20 years a generation would make 140 years? Granted they might be more like 15 years but that would still be 105?

Are you assuming Nehemiah is the same age as Ezra? I think he might have been younger. Joshua was probably quite a bit older than Nehemiah as well. I met some of my great-grandparents, and if I lived to see great-grandchildren that would be seven generations and not all that unusual. I mean, even if God does bless me with children, which does not seem overly likely at this point, I will not see great-grandchildren, but if I got married at 20 I might well have done. Seven generations is not all that crazy.

I received the following question:

I have a quick question concerning heaven. You know how the word heaven is used today in the Christian church how that people say they are going to heaven or that their relatives are in heaven.

I understand that the word heaven appears in the Bible over 600 times, are there any scripture verses that has the word heaven and that believer go to heaven at dead in the same verse ? I don’t think so, just want to get someone else’s opinion. Appreciate you quick response.

You are correct. No, there are no verses that say this anywhere in the Bible. The verses they stake all on are II Corinthians 5:8, misquoted as “Absent from the body, present with the Lord.” This says nothing about death or heaven, and besides being misquoted is badly translated. John 14:2, “In My Father’s house are many mansions; if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.” There is nothing saying the “Father’s house” is heaven. In fact, in John 2, the phrase (the only other place in the Word it is used) is clearly speaking of the temple in Jerusalem. Philippians 3:20, “For our citizenship is in heaven, from which we also eagerly wait for the Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.” This verse is the “impregnable fortress” that they try to hide behind to rescue their traditional ideas. However, the meaning of the verse is far from clear, and to say that we wait for a Savior from heaven is a far cry from saying we are going there, either at death or any other time. Other than these few, misused and abused verses, there is no evidence of anyone going to heaven upon death in the Bible.

Thanks for the great question.

I received the following question:

Revelation 1:4, 11 – this speaks of “the seven ekklesias which are in Asia.” Does this mean that the territory known as the province of Asia will belong to the nation of Israel in the kingdom of God? Since all Israelites will have been restored to their own land in that day, how does it happen that there are seven ekklesias in Asia unless that territory belongs to Israel? And what is the significance of these ekklesias being only in Asia and not elsewhere in the land? Please explain.

You bring up a very good question here, and one that I have puzzled over myself. Why should any Jews be in Asia during the kingdom of God? We can of course understand why they were there when the New Testament was written, but believing as I do that this book is written to Jews of the future, not those of the past, this means that they will be living there again in the kingdom of God. Yet after thinking about it I do believe that there are some hints in the Bible as to why this must be so. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

Romans 5:14 – It is my understanding that “the figure of Him that was to come” has to refer to Moses and not to the man Adam. Deut. 18:15 certainly points to Moses. I see no “figure” in the man Adam that compares in any way to the Lord Jesus Christ. And if you read this verse leaving out the middle clause, it would be, “Nevertheless death reigned from Adam to Moses, who is the figure of Him that was to come.” Please comment.

Again, let us start out by considering Mr. Sellers’ Resultant Version. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

Colossians 2:13 – I need a more detailed explanation of this verse. I understand from Eph. 2:1 and 5 that it should read “being dead TO sins.” Why is it not the same in Col. 2:13? The whole context of Colossians, written to believers, seems to support the reading of being dead TO sins, not dead in sins. The Greek word suzoopoieo occurs only in Eph. 2:5 and Col. 2:13. Why would Paul say in Eph. 2:15, “We also being dead TO the offenses, makes us alive together in Christ Jesus,” and then tell the Colossians believers, “And you, being dead IN your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath He quickened together with Him, having forgiven you all trespasses”? It seems to me that all believers, having been made alive together in Christ Jesus, would necessarily be dead TO sins and not dead IN sins. The Companion Bible notes on verse 13 says “being, i.e. at that time.” But I don’t see anything in the Greek to indicate their past condition. Please enlighten me on this verse.

I start off by quoting Mr. Sellers’ Resultant Version of this verse, along with the notes, and my commentary on the verse. Read the rest of this entry »

Psalm 58

A Michtam of David.

Here we have another Michtam psalm of David, like Psalms 56 and 57. As The Companion Bible suggests in Appendix 65 XII, this word has to do with writing, particularly engraving. Since most writing is not engraving, this indicates its importance. It is “set in stone,” as our figure of speech would have it. Rotherham makes it “A Tablet.” Yet we would prefer to refer this to a mark of importance. These psalms are important enough that their truths should be permanently engraved. Thus we should pay particular attention to them and let them have their effect on our minds and hearts.

There is no comment here on the circumstances which led David to write this psalm, but the situation becomes plain enough as we read the psalm. Read the rest of this entry »

Psalm 57

A Michtam of David when he fled from Saul into the cave.

Now we have another Michtam psalm of David, like Psalm 56. As The Companion Bible suggests, it has to do with writing, particularly engraving. Since most writing is not graven, this indicates its importance. It is “set in stone,” as our figure of speech would have it. Rotherham makes it “A Tablet.” Yet we would prefer to refer this to a mark of importance. These psalms are to be engraven; their lesson is to be remembered.

The occasion of this psalm is the time that David fled from Saul into the cave. Our best guess would be that this refers to the incident recorded in I Samuel 24. Let us consider from I Samuel 23:26. Read the rest of this entry »

Psalm 56

A Michtam of David when the Philistines captured him in Gath.

This psalm begins a series of Michtam psalms, running from Psalm 56 to Psalm 60, all of which are by David. The only other Michtam psalm is Psalm 16, also by David, which we have already studied. As explained in The Companion Bible Appendix 65, the word “Michtam” comes from the Hebrew word “Katam,” which means to cut in or engrave. In the Septuagint, the word used to translate Katam is connected with the words engraved on a sepulchral monument, and we can see in the Michtam psalms the idea of death and resurrection. The reference is to a graven and therefore permanent writing. Since most writing is not graven, this indicates its importance. It is “set in stone,” as our figure of speech would have it. Read the rest of this entry »

Psalm 55 Continued

12. For it is not an enemy who reproaches me;

David is even more vexed because of who it is who is the terrible enemy who is doing all this to him. It was not one he had thought of as an enemy at all who reproached him.

Then I could bear it.

David testifies that he could bear it if it was an enemy who had done all this to him.

Nor is it one who hates me who has exalted himself against me;

Nor is it one who in the past has hated David who has exalted himself against him. Of course, we cannot say that he does not hate David now, for his actions show that he does. Yet what David means is in the past. This one had not been a hater of David at all before this current, sad situation arose.

Then I could hide from him.

If it was one who was a known hater and enemy of David, then David could hide from him. It would be much easier to deal with such an enemy, if he was one who had always been David’s enemy. People would have expected this one to be against David, and he would have been able to hide from him and keep him at a distance. Read the rest of this entry »