The “age of accountability” is a doctrine that is common among many today, particularly in the evangelical movement. This is especially a concern of parents who have had children die in their youth, long before they might ever have heard the gospel of Jesus Christ and believed it. Traditional Christianity solved this problem by inventing the concept of infant baptism, whereby a child was made “safe in the church” until he should reach an age when he could decide for himself whether or not he would be a good church member on his own volition or not. Yet the modern evangelical movement has realized the unbiblical nature of this idea, and has rightfully insisted that no one can be saved by an act done upon them in infancy through no will or decision of their own. Yet this leaves for them the problem of what happens to children, then, who have died without reaching an age at which they were capable of understanding the gospel and making a decision for themselves. Since many in evangelical churches have had children who died just this way, these people are upset and seek answers regarding this question. To answer these concerns, the doctrine of the “age of accountability” has been formulated. The idea of the “age of accountability” is that a child who dies before he was old enough to be accountable is automatically saved rather than automatically lost since he was too young to be accountable. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

In previous articles we have gone through and examined every occurrence of the Hebrew word “Sheol,” the word often translated as “hell” in many English Bible versions. We saw that it is something that both the righteous and the wicked expect to go to when they die. After examining its use we concluded that it is not a place at all, but rather a state of being, basically the state of death. Those who are in Sheol are those who are in the death state. Yet Sheol is the death state with resurrection in view, which is why both the righteous and the wicked, both God’s people and His enemies, are said to be there after death. Read the rest of this entry »

Many would insist that the Bible speaks very clearly about hell. Yet questioning such people usually shows that they obviously have never properly considered the Biblical evidence regarding hell. No source but the Bible is truly a reliable one for discovering the reality about the idea that the wicked are bound for a place of eternal suffering called “hell,” yet many get their ideas as much from tradition, orthodoxy, or the songs and hymns they sing as they do from the pages of God’s Word. It is not enough just to say we are Bible believers. In order to actually be that, we need to discover what the Bible says and then believe it. That has been our goal in this study so far. Read the rest of this entry »

In our last message in this series, “Heaven in the Books of Exodus to Deuteronomy,” we discussed that the Hebrew word for heaven is “shamayim,” pronounced “sha-MAH’-yim.” We examined the fourteen occurrences of the word “heaven” in the book of Exodus, the one occurrence of “heaven” in the book of Leviticus, and the first thirteen occurrences of “heaven” in the first four chapters of the book of Deuteronomy. Along with our previous study of the first forty-one occurrences of the word “heaven” as they appear in the book of Genesis, this study took us through the first sixty-nine occurrences of the Hebrew word shemayim. From these studies we found what seem to be the following five definitions of the word “heaven.”

1. The exalted place where the LORD is and where angels dwell.

2. The sky, which is lifted up above the earth.

3. The greater universe, where the sun, moon, stars, planets, and galaxies exist.

4. Exalted beings or rulers, whether rulers of heaven or rulers on earth.

5. God Himself, Who is sometimes called heaven or the heavens.

Yet there is much more to learn about this word from the remainder of its occurrences in Scripture, so in this message we will continue our examination of this important word by continuing on from chapter 5 of the book of Deuteronomy. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following comments:

Nathan, I been praying for you that our Lord would give you wisdom / scripture discernment. 2 Timothy 3:16, the word of God is profitable for correction + more. Please humble yourself and learn, prophecy of Matthew 12:18-21 was given by Isaiah 42:1-8 and fulfilled when Jesus went to the Father (seated at the right hand of Glory). John 16:7-16 best explains as the Holy Spirit is the fulfillment. He is the Spirit of truth, 2 Corinthians ch. 3 explains our ministry. I have lots more information for you (regarding eschatology), you can call me at (xxx) xxx-xxxx, (name), servant of our Lord, evangelist, US military veteran (Desert Storm & Somalia), bible scholar, fluent in English & Spanish, study Hebrew & Greek.

Thank you for listening to the radio program, and for your prayers. We all need God’s wisdom when dealing with His truth, and certainly Scripture requires much discernment in order to understand it and to know the truth! Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

Could I ask a question with respect to Genesis 3:16 (NKJV)

16. To the woman He said:
“I will greatly multiply your sorrow and your conception;
In pain you shall bring forth children;
Your desire shall be for your husband,
And he shall rule over you.”

I have been told elsewhere that “Your desire shall be for your husband” should render “Your desire shall be to usurp your husband.” Is that claim accurate?

The question here seems to be just what “your desire shall be toward your husband” (literally “your man,” since Hebrew has no word for “husband,”) means? I have heard this idea you mention as well, that it means “your desire shall be toward your husband’s position,” in other words you will want to rule, but he will rule over you. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following comment:

THE LORD JESUS CHRIST DIED AT THE STAKE, NOT ON A CROSS

I of course am aware of this argument, as Bullinger makes it in The Companion Bible. I am not convinced, however.

First of all, in spite of Bullinger’s statements, the archeological evidence seems to point to crucifixions having been done with a cross piece, not on a stake. The early depictions and descriptions seem to confirm this. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

Hi Nathan, I have a question regarding something you said. It was such a blockbuster bit of information to me that I wrote it down, but I want to be sure that I have it correct.

I wrote, “The PASSOVER – folks outside the land could not partake of this feast which only could be carried out in the land. As a result, THE SINS OF THOSE OUTSIDE THE LAND WERE NOT FORGIVEN.”

Is this what you said?

Thanks.

There were two parts to this. One was the Day of Atonement. This was made yearly on the tenth day of the seventh month. It was the day all Israel was to fast, because on that day the priest was making atonement for them to cleanse them from all their sins. This was the “year by year” cleansing of sins that Silas speaks of in Hebrews 10:1. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

I’m moving from becoming an Acts 2 dispy to an Acts 28 dispy. I’m sorting a lot of things out so please forgive me if you have addressed this before in your letters. Would you say there are two gospels in scripture? The (#1) Gospel of the Kingdom (from Matthew to Acts 28) and the (#2) Gospel of the Grace of God (from the resurrection to today). If this is true then during the Acts period there would be two gospels active at the same time? I’m I thinking about this correctly?

First of all, I think we need to have a proper idea of the meaning of the word “gospel.” It is often said in Christian circles that it means the “good news.” While there is some truth to this, I would say we could define it a little more clearly. It is good (eu in euangelion means “good”), but it is good because it is right. Not every aspect of it is necessarily good news. For example, part of the gospel of our salvation is the fact that we are sinners deserving of God’s wrath. This is not exactly “good news,” but it is the right news, and it is the news we need to hear. Of course, there are other aspects to it with happier connotations than that. Read the rest of this entry »

In our last message in this series, “Heaven in the Book of Genesis,” we discussed that the Hebrew word for heaven is “shamayim,” pronounced “sha-MAH’-yim,” and the first occurrence of this word is in the very first verse of the Bible, Genesis 1:1. We examined this verse and the first forty-one occurrences of the word “heaven” as they appear in the book of Genesis. From our examination of all Genesis we found what seem to be the following three definitions of the word “heaven.”

1. The exalted place where the LORD is, and where angels dwell.

2. The sky, which is lifted up above the earth.

3. The greater universe, where the sun, moon, stars, planets, and galaxies exist. Read the rest of this entry »