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ghostman02I received the following questions:

Many of my friends are arguing with me about the reason we are resurrected is for our heavenly bodies but not because we are not in heaven when we die (sheol).  I don’t really know what to say to this?

I’ve been reading in Hebrews that Hezekiah was pleading not to die, but if he thought he was going to heaven when he died why would he plead to not die, right?  Does this make sense for an argument against not going to heaven when you die?

Any help please?

Your friends are arguing, not based on Bible truth, but on the doctrines and traditions of men. Satan told Eve, “You will not surely die.” Genesis 3:4. Literally in Hebrew, this reads, “Dying you will not die.” Eve believed him…that dying, she would not be dead, but be in some other state, “like God.” (verse 5.) And the vast majority of people on earth, including most Christians, still believe what Satan said rather than what God said. They refuse to believe that death results in being dead, instead insisting that the dead are still very much alive. Read the rest of this entry »

pets02I received the following question:

Do animals have a spirit? And if they do is it the same spirit? Would them make them be in heaven?

Most definitely yes, as can be seen clearly my study on “Spirits and Souls,” here: https://precepts.wordpress.com/2014/06/16/spirits-and-souls/ . We never even got out of the first book of the Bible to learn this! If you have the time and want to, though, you can really solidify it in your mind by continuing the study I began and looking at ALL the occurrences of these two words. In Greek, spirit = pneuma and soul = psuche.

Asking if it is the same spirit is another good question! Ecclesiastes 3:18-22 says, Read the rest of this entry »

Who is writing what to whom − when, where, and why?

“what”JAMES

“who” – Written by the apostle James, “a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ” (James 1:1). The name in Greek was Iakobos (Jacobus/Jacob), but was translated as “James” in the KJV and other early English translations. This James was identified as “the Lord’s brother” (Galatians 1:19).

“to whom” – To the leaders (ekklesias – out-positioned) of “the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad.”

“when” – During The Great Scattering described in Acts 8-12 (A.D. 40s).

“where” – Written from Jerusalem.

“why” – The purpose of James was to address the leaders (ekklesias) of those who were scattered during The Great Scattering, the second period of Acts, following The Great Unity. It was written to deal with issues that the believers were facing, such as personal trials of faith, the conflict between rich and poor, and the hypocrisy of those who said they had faith and yet did not act upon it. Read the rest of this entry »

trashcan02I received the following question:

Nathan, would you please explain to me your views on hell? Thank you.

I will try to be basic and understandable, yet thorough enough that you get the idea.

The first fact we need to understand is that “hell” is on a much more shaky ground translation-wise even than “baptism.” “Baptism,” as I said, is really a Greek word that is not translated. “Hell,” on the other hand, is a very questionable translation of any word in the Hebrew or the Greek of the Old and New Testaments. In the Old Testament, “hell” is exclusively translated from the Hebrew word sheol. The problem is that sheol is not consistently translated “hell.” It is translated “hell” 31 times, only about half of the time it occurs. It is translated “grave” another 31 times. 3 times (these numbers are from the King James Version) it is translated “the pit.” How a word could mean “hell,” “grave,” and “the pit” all at the same time, I am sure I do not know. Read the rest of this entry »

dictionaryword02I received the following question:

Nathan, you make a distinction between “the” new covenant as opposed to “a” new covenant, but II Cor. 3:6 says “the” new covenant.  It would be difficult to convince a covenant theology guy that at least when this was written, this is not “the” new covenant of Jer. 31.

The phrase “the new covenant” in II Corinthians 3:6 is inaccurate. In Luke 22:20, the phrase is he kaine diatheke, “the new covenant.” The same is true in I Corinthians 11:25, he kaine diatheke, “the new covenant.” In II Corinthians 3:6, it is kaines diathekes, “(a) new covenant.” There is no “the” in the text. It is like Hebrews 8:8, diatheken kainen, “(a) covenant new.” Hebrews 9:15 is the same, diathekes kaines, “(a) covenant new.” Hebrews 12:24 is different, diathekes neas, “(a) covenant new.” Only the Lord uses the emphatic “THE new covenant.”

The idea is of a new agreement. Since the Lord is the Mediator of THE new covenant of Jeremiah 31, it is difficult to say that the apostles were also mediators of it. The fact that the agreement they were mediating was not that of Jeremiah 31 is clear from the fact that none of the truths of the covenant of Jeremiah 31 came to be in the Acts period.

ibelieve02I received the following letter:

Hello Sir,

I found your website and I have a few questions if you have time. (They should be fairly quick response if you have the time)

1.) Are you an “Acts 28er” as in you believe the body Christ started at Acts 28:28?
(yes/no)

2.) Do you believe God preserved His exact words?

3.) Which Hebrew and Greek texts contain the exact words of God? (if answered yes to #2)

4.) Which translation is most reliable to the most reliable manuscripts?

5.) What do you think of this post “M.A.D. Baptist” http://av1611studyblog.blogspot.com/p/water.html

If you do not have time then that is fine. Just know I have no desire to initiate a debate, I will not respond back accept to “thanks” to ensure that doesn’t happen.

Grace and Peace,

I would be happy to answer your questions as best I can. Read the rest of this entry »

mask02We have but one book left of the Pentateuch or Torah to examine in order to have studied all the occurrences of the word “soul” in these first five books of the Old Testament. In our previous articles in this series, examining the word nephesh or “soul” in Genesis through Numbers, we discovered eight possible meanings for this word, which are as follows:

1. Any living creature of the land, sea, or air.

2. Any of the above creatures after they are dead.

3. What man is as a product of his body and his breath of life being mixed together.

4. The blood of men, or something connected to the blood of men.

5. People.

6. A person’s self or being.

7. A dead person.

8. The emotions, strong feelings, and desires of men.

So now we continue our study into the book of Deuteronomy. Let us see if these eight definitions continue to cover all the occurrences of this word, and what else we can learn about souls from this last book of Moses.

Deuteronomy 4:9. Only take heed to yourself, and diligently keep yourself, lest you forget the things your eyes have seen, and lest they depart from your heart all the days of your life. And teach them to your children and your grandchildren,

They are to take heed to themselves and diligently keep their souls. The danger is that they will forget the things they have seen the LORD do for them, and they will depart from their hearts all the days of their lives. To diligently keep their souls is to diligently keep themselves, and to ensure that the things the LORD has done for them remain in their memory. The nephesh is the person, and is here connected with the memory and the heart. The emotions and desires of a person, if they are not focused on the LORD and diligently maintained, can cause him to forget what he should remember and can remove from his heart the things that should remain there.

Read the rest of this entry »

sealion02In our previous articles in this series, we examined all the occurrences of the Hebrew word for “soul,” nephesh, in the books of Genesis through Leviticus. We discovered eight possible meanings for this word from our examination of these books, which are as follows:

1. Any living creature of the land, sea, or air.

2. Any of the above creatures after they are dead.

3. What man is as a product of his body and his breath of life being mixed together.

4. The blood of men, or something connected to the blood of men.

5. People.

6. A person’s self or being.

7. A dead person.

8. The emotions, strong feelings, and desires of men.

Read the rest of this entry »

In our previous articles in this series, “Souls in Genesis” and “Souls in Exodus,” we examined all the occurrences of the Hebrew word for “soul,” nephesh, in the first two books of the Bible. We discovered six possible meanings for this word from our examinations of Genesis and Exodus, which are as follows:

1. Any creature of the land, sea, or air.

2. What man is as a product of his body and his breath of life being mixed together.

3. The blood of men, or something connected to the blood of men.

4. People.

5. A person’s self or being.

6. The emotions, strong feelings, and desires of men.

Read the rest of this entry »

anatomy02In our previous article in this series, “Souls in Genesis,” we examined all the occurrences of the Hebrew word for “soul,” nephesh, in the first book of the Bible. We discovered six possible meanings for this word from our examination of Genesis, which are as follows:

1. Any creature of the land, sea, or air.

2. What man is as a product of his body and his breath of life being mixed together.

3. The blood of men, or something connected to the blood of men.

4. People.

5. A person’s self or being.

6. The emotions, strong feelings, and desires of men.

Read the rest of this entry »