I Timothy 3 Part 4

New King James Version 15. but if I am delayed, I write so that you may know how you ought to conduct yourself in the house of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and ground of the truth.

The Resultant Version 15. But if I should delay, that you may know how it is fitting to behave oneself in the house of God, which is the outcalled of the living God, the pillar and bulwark of the truth.

Paul realizes that he may be delayed. Perhaps he was having problems himself ministering in Macedonia, just as Timothy was having problems ministering in Ephesus. At any rate, Paul knows well that he may be delayed in coming to Timothy. Yet he does not want Timothy to be in the dark about these things, and so he is writing to him in case he is in fact delayed, as it appears he was. As we mentioned above, the delay apparently resulted in Paul never going to Ephesus at all. In II Timothy, Paul is urging Timothy to come to him in II Timothy 4:9, but he appears to have no plans to go to him in Ephesus. That fits right in with what God said in Acts 20:25. Read the rest of this entry »

I Timothy 3 Part 3

New King James Version 8. Likewise deacons must be reverent, not double-tongued, not given to much wine, not greedy for money,

The Resultant Version 8. The servants in the same way must be dignified, not double-tongued, not given to much wine, not a lover of money,

God has apparently completed His instructions regarding the choosing of over-watchers, and so He now goes on to describe qualifications for deacons. This word, though we probably recognize it from its frequent use in English, is really a transliteration of a Greek word diakonos. It is therefore not really an English word, and has never been translated. It seems to come from an ancient root that had to do with running errands. The word speaks of a servant, and so a “deacon” is one who serves. Read the rest of this entry »

I Timothy 3 Part 2

New King James Version 3. not given to wine, not violent, not greedy for money, but gentle, not quarrelsome, not covetous;

The Resultant Version 3. Not parallel with wine, not a striker, not greedy of money, but lenient, not a brawler, not a lover of money,

Now we have three negative criteria, or things an over-watcher should not be. First is not “given to wine.” The Greek word is paroinos. The first part of this word is para, from which we get our idea of “parallel lines.” Parallel lines are lines that are beside each other. The idea is that if you drew the lines out as long as you could in either direction, they would never intersect. In other words, the lines are truly beside one another. The one who is paroinos then is always beside wine or parallel with wine. Read the rest of this entry »

I Timothy 3

New King James Version 1. This is a faithful saying: If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work.

The Resultant Version 1.  This is a faithful saying: If any man desires the over-watch, he desires a good work.

Now we come upon the second of these “faithful sayings” that Paul gives us in his personal letters. The first we came on in I Timothy 1:15. Now, we come upon the second. It has to do, as the New King James Version has it, with a man desiring the position of a bishop. Yet we might wonder, what does this mean? And what exactly is a “bishop” in the Bible? Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

I greatly enjoy your studies.
Thank you for the time you spend writing them.
Had a question.
 
I’m very intrigued by the emphasis the Bible and NT specifically puts on being poor.
Jesus mentions the poor often.
You read things like “hath not God chosen the poor of this world rich in faith” in Hebrews
I plan to study this topic myself.
Have you ever looked into this?
Why would you be special because you have little money?
Or does “poor” really carry a different meaning than just having little wealth?
 
Thanks for any thoughts you might have

Glad you are enjoying the studies. You are very welcome for the time spent writing them.

You have hit on something with the idea that the “poor” carries a deeper meaning than just those with little money. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

1 Cor 9
19. For though I be free from all men, yet have I made myself servant unto all, that I might gain the more.
20 And unto the Jews I became as a Jew, that I might gain the Jews; to them that are under the law, as under the law, that I might gain them that are under the law;
21. To them that are without law, as without law, (being not without law to God, but under the law to Christ,) that I might gain them that are without law.
22. To the weak became I as weak, that I might gain the weak: I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some.
23. And this I do for the gospel’s sake, that I might be partaker thereof with you.

Hi Nathan, would you please explain this passage?  When Mid-Acts is presented with evidence that Paul was still operating under the Kingdom program during the Acts period, they use this passage to explain away things such as Paul preaching to the Jews, Paul performing signs and wonders, and Paul taking a Nazirite vow. Read the rest of this entry »

I received the following question:

I enjoyed reading your article on the Canaanite woman.  I am an Acts 9 Pauline dispensationalist.  What you seem to say is that for a while Paul was preaching the same Gospel as the 12 but only gradually began teaching something different.

My question is, why did God call out Paul if he were not specifically to preach a different Gospel?  Was God positioning Paul as a contingency, and why couldn’t He have just used one of the twelve to transition into something new?

What you ask is a good question, and I will be happy to give you my answer.

Before we get too far into an explanation, we had better make clear what a gospel is. The Greek word is euangelion, and comes from eu, which means “good,” and angelion, which means a message (as you can see, it is related to “angel” or messenger). However, it is important to point out that a gospel is good because it is right, not because it is necessarily “good news” to the one hearing it, as I have often heard it said of the gospel. Read the rest of this entry »

I Timothy 2 Part 3

New King James Version 11. Let a woman learn in silence with all submission.

The Resultant Version 11. Let a woman be learning in quietness in all subjection.

Paul now moves from the topic of women praying to the related topic of women learning. Yet again the word for “woman” here, gune, can mean a “wife” rather than simply a woman. His command to her is to learn in silence or quietness. This relates to an attitude of decorum, a proper attitude for learning. She is to learn with all submission, arranging herself under her teacher in order to learn. Read the rest of this entry »

I Timothy 2 Part 2

New King James Version 6. who gave Himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time,

The Resultant Version 6. Who gave Himself a ransom for all, a testimony in its own times.

This verse continues to speak of the Man Christ Jesus. He gave Himself a ransom for all. The word “ransom” here is the Greek word antilutron. Lutron is a ransom or payment, such as might be made for a slave to redeem him. The prefix anti does not mean “against,” as it does in English, but rather “instead of.” The point here is not just that Christ Jesus gave Himself as a ransom for all, but also that He gave Himself as a ransom instead of all. He paid the penalty we owed to God in our place. Praise God for the glorious ransom He gave! Read the rest of this entry »

I Timothy 2

New King James Version 1. Therefore I exhort first of all that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks be made for all men,

The Resultant Version 1. I encourage therefore, that, first of all, petitions, prayers, pleadings, and thanksgiving be made in behalf of all mankind;

Paul now speaks an exhortation “therefore,” which probably means in light of the fact that there are those who are enemies of and oppose faith, as he just pointed out in the previous chapter. The word “exhortation” here is the Greek parakaleo, which speaks of coming alongside someone to help and encourage that person. In this case, he is encouraging Timothy and those he is teaching to pray. Indeed, there is little else we really can do in light of those who oppose faith in their own lives and in the lives of others. Read the rest of this entry »